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In Print Articles on the Valor Medals Review Toggle Accordion

American Legion:

With American Legion support, a group of volunteers is proposing the first-ever review of World War I veterans who may have been denied a Medal of Honor due to racial or ethnic discrimination.

Baltimore CityBizList:

During World War I, Army Sgt. William Butler charged a squad of Germans and overran their position “single-handedly” with an automatic weapon slung over his shoulder, freeing U.S. prisoners, and “taking some of his own,” according to a local historian.

Baltimore Post Examiner:

“A group of decorated soldiers from the famed 369th “Harlem Hellfighters” proudly display the French Croix de guerre. Questions have long been raised as to why minority servicemen of World War I were bypassed in the awarding of valor medals, including the Medal of Honor.”

Baltimore Post Examiner:

Servicemembers of all races, religions, and backgrounds fought in WWI, but the Medal of Honor was patently denied to minority Veterans until the 1990s.

Business Insider:

The 369th Infantry Regiment, known as the Harlem Hellfighters, served on the front lines for 191 days during World War I, longer than any other American unit. Lawmakers are calling for a review of heroism by minority soldiers that may have gone overlooked for generations out of racism.

CBS Evening News:

Sgt. William Butler served with the renowned all-black 369th Infantry Regiment during World War I. His heroism made headlines after he rescued five Americans who had been taken prisoner, while killing at least five Germans.

Chestertown Spy (MD):

During World War I, Army Sgt. William Butler charged a squad of Germans and overran their position “single-handedly” with an automatic weapon slung over his shoulder, freeing U.S. prisoners, and “taking some of his own,” according to a local historian.

Connecting Vets:

Corporal Freddie Stowers served in Company [C], 371st Infantry Regiment, 93rd Division during the First World War. As a squad leader in a segregated unit, he led an attack on a German position while facing enemy fire.

Delmarva Now:

Maryland U.S. Sen. Chris Van Hollen and and Missouri U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt announced the World War I Valor Medals Review Act, new bipartisan legislation that will ensure that minority veterans who served during World War I get the recognition they deserve.

Dorchester Banner (MD):

On Thursday, U.S. Senator Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.) announced new bipartisan legislation to honor WWI Veterans of color with local veterans, historians, and community members at the Cambridge Empowerment Center.

Dorchester Star (MD):

Senator Chris Van Hollen, D-Md., and Senator Roy Blunt, R-Mo., announced Thursday, April 18, at the Octavine Saunders Empowerment Center on historic Pine Street, the World War I Valor Medals Review Act, new bipartisan legislation that will ensure minority veterans who served during World War I get recognition for their heroics.

EIN Presswire:

The U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate have introduced separate bills to require the systematic review of minority veterans who served in World War I. Park University has been the driving force behind the bipartisan bills introduced in Congress

Flatland:

Led by Park University history professor Dr. Timothy Westcott, the Valor Medals Review Task Force is conducting the world’s first systematic review of World War I to find Black, Hispanic, Asian, Native American and Jewish American soldiers who might have been denied a Medal of Honor due to discrimination against their race or religion.

History News Network:

Congress is preparing to order the Pentagon to review the records of scores of decorated soldiers who served in World War I to determine if they were denied the nation’s highest battlefield honor because of their race or religion.

KCTV5:

Two Park University students and a professor are taking on a mission to right the wrongs of the past. They want to make sure African American soldiers from the Great War get the honor they deserve.

KCUR:

One day in September of 1918, First Lieutenant George Robb’s job was to take a French town called Sechault from the Germans who’d claimed it.

Military.com:

World War I experts, professors and students are carefully reviewing century-old military records to determine whether systemic racism cost combat heroes the valor awards they earned.

Military.com:

Lawmakers and advocates are calling for a detailed review of the battlefield valor of African-American troops in World War I, saying many were denied the Medal of Honor due to racism.

Park University (MO):

The U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate have introduced separate bills to require the systematic review of minority veterans who served in World War I.

Politico:

Lawmakers want the Pentagon to take another look at scores of soldiers who may have been denied the nation’s highest military honor due to their race or religion.

Star-Democrat (Easton, MD):

Senator Chris Van Hollen, D-Md., and Senator Roy Blunt, R-Mo., announced Thursday, April 18, at the Octavine Saunders Empowerment Center on historic Pine Street, the World War I Valor Medals Review Act, new bipartisan legislation that will ensure minority veterans who served during World War I get recognition for their heroics.

Talbot Spy (MD):

During World War I, Army Sgt. William Butler charged a squad of Germans and overran their position “single-handedly” with an automatic weapon slung over his shoulder, freeing U.S. prisoners, and “taking some of his own,” according to a local historian.

Veterans of Foreign Wars:

The Veterans of Foreign Wars National Commander William “Doc” Schmitz presented a $70,000 donation to Park University President Dr. Greg Gunderson today in support of the university’s research initiative into the awarding or denying of World War I military service medals based on racial bias.

Warrensburg Star-Journal (MO):

The U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate have introduced separate bills to require the systematic review of minority veterans who served in World War I.

Washington Post:

Why do we have to keep opening old wounds, removing Confederate statues, debating reparations for slavery, acknowledging history’s injustices?